The Soy Connection for Health Professionals

Health & Nutrition - Spring, 2017 - Vol 25, No 2 Fighting Cancer: Can Soy Be of Benefit?

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The Soy Connection for Health Professionals

Health & Nutrition - Spring, 2017 - Vol 25, No 2 Fighting Cancer: Can Soy Be of Benefit?

In This Issue: 

  • Cancer is the second most common cause of death worldwide; cardiovascular disease ranks first. Developed countries have higher cancer incidence and mortality rates than less developed or developing countries, regardless of gender.

Role of Soy in the Prevention, Treatment of Six Cancer Types

Since the early 1990s soyfoods have been widely investigated for their potential role in cancer prevention. Much of this research has been conducted because soyfoods are uniquely-rich sources of isoflavones. Most of the cancer research involving soy has focused on breast and prostate cancer because these cancers are known to be hormonally regulated and countries that consume soyfoods have low incidence rates of both cancers. Previous issues of this newsletter have addressed these two cancers and the reader is referred to the references for additional information on breast and prostate cancer. Read more

Cancer Trends Worldwide and Across America

One out of every third individual will encounter a cancer diagnosis in his or her lifetime. While projections indicate approximately 22 million Americans will be diagnosed with cancer over the next 20 years, more people are surviving their cancers and death rates from cancer are declining, in part due to improved screening, detection and treatment advancements. This article describes distinct patterns and trends of cancer rates and deaths worldwide and in the United States, according to most recent published data. Read more

Observational Studies Show Omega-6 PUFA Lowers CVD Risk, is not Proinflammatory

Newly published epidemiologic research goes a long way toward addressing two highly debated issues related to the health implications of dietary fat. More specifically, Chinese researchers provide evidence which supports a considerable amount of clinical data showing that the consumption of omega-6 polyunsaturated fat (PUFA) is not proinflammatory. In addition, U.S. researchers show that dairy fat can increase risk of cardiovascular disease but whether it does depends upon the macronutrient that replaces it in the diet. Read more