REFERENCED ARTICLES FROM THE BENEFITS OF BIOTECHNOLOGY COMPENDIUM BROCHURE

 

 

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  1. Food, Agriculture, Conservation, and Trade Act of 1990 (FACTA), Public Law 101-624, Title XVI, Subtitle A, Section 1603 (Government Printing Office, Washington, DC, 1990) NAL Call # KF1692.A31 1990.
    • The Food, Agriculture, Conservation, and Trade Act of 1990 (P.L. 101-624) establishes a comprehensive framework within which the Secretary of Agriculture will administer agricultural and food programs from 1991 to 1995. This report describes provisions of the 1990 Act as amended by the Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1990 (P.L. 101-508).
  2. United States Census Bureau, International Database.
  3. Ibid.
  4. UN News Center. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon Rome (Italy Address at High-level Conference on World Food Security. United Nations.
    • The world needs to produce more food. Food production needs to rise by 50% by the year 2030 to meet the rising demand. We have an historic opportunity to revitalize agriculture - especially in countries where productivity gains have been low in recent years.
  5. Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, Statement on Biotechnology, March 2000
    • Biotechnology provides powerful tools for the sustainable development of agriculture, fisheries and forestry and can be of significant help in meeting the food needs of a growing and increasingly urbanized population, the UN Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO)...
  6. Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations. World Food Situation.
    • The ten most frequently asked questions about the rise in food prices in the marketing year 2007/2008.
  7. Rosenthal, Elisabeth. 2007. World Food Supply is Shrinking. New York Times, December 18
    • In an "unforeseen and unprecedented" shift, the world food supply is dwindling rapidly and food prices are soaring to historic levels...
  8. Cookson, Clive. 2008. A time to sow? GM food could curb the cost of staples. Financial Times, July 10.
    • As world food prices surge and shortages loom, genetically modified crops look increasingly tempting as a way to raise agricultural yields without using more energy or chemicals. Even in Europe, where GM crops have faced the strongest public resistance, more politicians, experts and farmers' leaders are speaking out in their favour.
  9. Sample, Ian. 2008. Hunger in Africa blamed on western rejection of GM food. The Guardian, September 8.
    • The rise of organic farming and rejection of GM crops in Britain and other developed countries is largely to blame for the impoverishment of Africa...
  10. Ibid.
  11. Reporter's Notebook. G8 Leaders Call for Increased Global Access to Agricultural Biotechnology. Council for Biotechnology Information. July 2008.
    • The G8 leaders, meeting in Hokkaido, Japan at their annual summit, agreed to work to increase global agricultural yields by providing farmers with greater access to seed varieties developed through biotechnology.
  12. James, Clive. 2010. Global Status of Commercialized Biotech/GM Crops: 2010. ISAAA Brief No. 42. International Service for the Acquisition of Agri-Biotech Applications (ISAAA): Ithaca, NY.
    • In just 15 years after commercialization, accumulated biotech crops exceeded 1 billion hectares in 2010, a milestone that signifies biotech crops are here to stay...
  13. Brookes & Barfoot. Global Impact of Biotech Crops: Socio-Economic and Environmental Effects, 2011.
    • This article updates the assessment of the impact commercialized agricultural biotechnology is having on global agriculture from an environmental perspective. It focuses on the impact of changes in pesticide use and greenhouse gas emissions arising from the use of biotech crops.
  14. USDA Economic Research Service. Adoption of Genetically Engineered Crops in the U.S.: Soybeans Varieties.
    • Genetically engineered (GE) soybean varieties by State and United States, 2000-2011
  15. PG Economics.
    • PG Economics Homepage
  16. USDA National Agriculture Statistics Service.
    • United States Department of Agriculture National Agricultural Statistics Service
  17. PG Economics.
    • PG Economics Homepage
  18. Brookes & Barfoot. Global Impact of Biotech Crops: Socio-Economic and Environmental Effects, 2011.
    • This article updates the assessment of the impact commercialized agricultural biotechnology is having on global agriculture from an environmental perspective. It focuses on the impact of changes in pesticide use and greenhouse gas emissions arising from the use of biotech crops.
  19. Excellence Through Stewardship. Agricultural Biotechnology: Benefits Delivered.
    • Crops improved through biotechnology have been adopted by farmers in the United States and around the world at rates never before seen by any other advances in the history of agriculture.
  20. Hancock, J.F. 2004. Plant Evolution and the Origin of Crop Species, second edition. CAB International.
    • The purpose of this paper is to describe the contributions of crop research to evolutionary biology, particularly in the areas of population genetics, speciation and polyploidy.
  21. IFT Expert Report on Biotechnology and Foods: Human Food Safety Evaluation of rDNA. Biotechnology-Derived Foods. Food Technology, vol. 54, no. 9, September 2000.
    • All foods produced using rDNA biotechnology to date have undergone a science-based safety assessment focusing on the product characteristics prior to entering the marketplace. Crops modified by modern molecular and cellular methods do not pose risks any different from those modified for similar traits by earlier genetic methods.
  22. Ibid.
  23. Ibid.
  24. NAS. 1987. Introduction of recombinant DNA-engineered organisms into the environment: Key issues. Natl. Acad. Of Sciences. National Academy Press, Washington, D.C.
    • In 1987, the NAS published a summary of key issues related to the introduction of recombinant DNA-engineered (rDNA-engineered) organisms into the environment (NAS 1987). This brief white paper outlined the expected risks and benefits associated with all types of transgenic organisms, including bacteria, insects, fish, and crop plants.
  25. NIH. 1992. National Biotechnology Policy Board report. Natl. Insts. of Health, Bethesda, Md.
    • Not available online.
  26. UK. 1993. Regulation of the United Kingdom biotechnology industry and global competitiveness. October. United Kingdom's House of Lords Select Committee on Science and Technology.
    • The report calls for amendments of the EC directives to promote the biotech industry.
  27. FAO/WHO. 1991. Strategies for assessing the safety of foods produced by biotechnology. Report of a Joint FAO/WHO Expert Consultation. Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations and World Health Organization. WHO, Geneva, Switzerland.
    • Since the nineteenth century, the science of biotechnology had developed more rapidly than ever before and particularly so over the past decade. While there were many applications of biotechnology in areas such as drugs, the new technologies were also potentially capable of revolutionizing the world's food supply.
  28. FAO/WHO. 1996. Biotechnology and Food Safety. Report of a Joint FAO/WHO Expert Consultation. Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations and World Health Organization. WHO, Geneva, Switzerland.
    • Biotechnology provides new and powerful tools for research and for accelerating the development of new and better foods. Dr. de Haen outlined FAO's position that modern biotechnologies should be used as adjuncts to, and not as substitutes for, conventional technologies in solving problems related to food production or processing.
  29. FAO/WHO. 2000. Safety aspects of genetically modified foods of plant origin. Report of a Joint FAO/WHO Expert Consultation on Foods Derived from Biotechnology. Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations and World Health Organization. WHO, Geneva, Switzerland.
    • Ms Singh indicated that biotechnology would provide powerful tools for the sustainable development of agriculture and food production. When appropriately integrated with other technologies for the food production, biotechnology can be of significant assistance in meeting the needs of an expanding and increasingly urbanized population in the new millennium.
  30. OECD. 1993. "Safety Evaluation of Foods Derived by Modern Biotechnology: Concepts and Principles." Org. for Economic Cooperation and Development, Paris.
    • This report is intended for the use of those involved in carrying out safety evaluations of new foods or food components derived by means of modern biotechnology. It elaborates scientific principles to be considered in making such evaluations, based on a comparison with traditional foods that have a safe history of use.
  31. OECD. 1998. Report of the OECD Workshop on Toxicological and Nutritional Testing of Novel Foods. Org. for Economic Cooperation and Development, Paris.
    • This workshop focused its attention on new foods obtained from genetically modified plants, with the goals of: obtaining a better understanding of the role of analytical/toxicological studies in assessing possible unexpected or unintended adverse effects; examining possible approaches through research to develop improved methods for safety assessment that may yield better, more efficient, less costly tests or tests that use fewer animals; and increasing mutual understanding of safety testing among Member countries.
  32. OECD. 2000. Report of the Task Force for the Safety of Novel Foods and Feeds. Org. for Economic Cooperation and Development, Paris. 86/ADDI, May 17.
    • In the light of increasing importance of issues concerning food safety, the leaders of the Group of Eight industrialised countries and the Ministers invited the OECD Working Group on Harmonisation of Regulatory Oversight of Biotechnology and the OECD Task Force for the Safety of Novel Foods and Feeds to undertake a study of the implications of biotechnology and other aspects of food safety.
  33. NRC. 2000. "Genetically Modified Pest-Protected Plants: Science and Regulation." Natl. Res. Council. National Academy Press, Washington, D.C.
    • This book explores the risks and benefits of crops that are genetically modified for pest resistance, the urgency of establishing an appropriate regulatory framework for these products, and the importance of public understanding of the issues.
  34. Europa Press Release. Biotech Food is Safe: Is Anyone Going to Tell the Consumer?
    • EuropaBio welcomes the report issued by the Joint Research Centre today that reconfirms the results of a 2001 Commission study concluding that no demonstration of any health effect of GM food products has ever been reported and the use of more precise technology and the greater regulatory scrutiny very likely makes them even safer than conventional plants and foods.
  35. European Commission. 2008. Scientific and Technical Contribution to the development of an overall health strategy in the area of GMOs.
    • The present study is intended to contribute an open debate with a broad range of stakeholders on the potential health impact associated with the consumption of GMOs.
  36. European Commission, December 2010, A Decade of EU-Funded GMO Research.
    • Drawing on the remarkable evolution of biology as a scientific discipline, the concept of the Knowledge-Based Bio-Economy provides many scientific and technical solutions to enhance resource efficiencies while reducing environmental footprints in an economically viable and socially responsible manner.
  37. Pew Initiative on Food and Biotechnology. 2007. Application of Biotechnology for Functional Foods. The Pew Cheritable Trusts.
    • This report looks at the potential to develop functional foods through the application of modern biotechnology. The first section describes some recent scientific advances that could lead to functional foods on grocery store shelves, and the second section analyzes the legal authorities that could govern the use of biotechnology-derived functional foods.
  38. Campos, Hannia; Baylin, Ana; Willett, Walter. 2008. Linolenic Acid and Risk of Nonfatal Acute Myocardial Infarction. Circulation. 118:339-345.
    • Consumption of vegetable oils rich in a-linolenic acid could confer important cardiovascular protection. The apparent protective effect of a-linolenic acid is most evident among subjects with low intakes.
  39. Henderson, Mark. 2007. GM crops are the only way to solve Britons' diet failings, say scientists. The Times, November 16.
    • Genetically modified crops will be the only sustainable way of solving Britain's dietary shortcomings, scientists claim. Barely one in four British adults consumes close to the recommended quantities of critical omega-3 fatty acids found chiefly in oily fish.
  40. Conservation Technology Information Center (CTIC). 2010. Facilitating Conservation Practices and Enhancing Environmental Sustainability with Agricultural Biotechnology. CTIC, West Lafayette, Indiana, p. 9.
    • In this document, we will explore how plant biotechnology and the sustainable farming systems it helps facilitate—in soybeans as well as in other crops—are helping farmers grow more food, feed, fiber and fuel while protecting the environment.
  41. Brookes & Barfoot, 2011.
    • This article updates the assessment of the impact commercialized agricultural biotechnology is having on global agriculture from an environmental perspective. It focuses on the impact of changes in pesticide use and greenhouse gas emissions arising from the use of biotech crops.
  42. Brinch-Pedersen H, Olesen A, Rasmussen SK, Holm PB. Generation of transgenic wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) for constitutive accumulation of an Aspergillus phytase. Mol Breeding. 2000;6:195—206.
    • It is concluded that a functional Aspergillus phytase can be produced in significant amounts in wheat grains. This may be of relevance for improving the phytate-phosphorus digestibility when wheat grains are used for non-ruminant animal feed.
  43. Denbow DM, Graubau EA, Lacy GH, Kornegay ET, Russell DR, Umbek PF. Soybeans transformed with a fungal phytase gene improve phosphorus availability for broilers. Poult. Sci. 1998;77:878—881.
    • It appears from this study that phytase can improve growth performance of broilers fed low nP diets when provided either as a commercial supplement or in the form of transformed seeds.
  44. CTIC, 2010.
  45. Brookes & Barfoot, 2011.
    • This article updates the assessment of the impact commercialized agricultural biotechnology is having on global agriculture from an environmental perspective. It focuses on the impact of changes in pesticide use and greenhouse gas emissions arising from the use of biotech crops.
  46. Council for Agricultural Science and Technology (CAST). 2007. Implications of Gene Flow in the Scale-up and Commercial Use of Biotechnology-derived Crops: Economic and Policy Considerations. Issue Paper 37. CAST, Ames, Iowa. p. 10.
    • This paper reviews the concept of gene flow—the successful transfer of genetic information between different individuals, populations, and generations (to progeny) and across spatial dimensions. The paper also discusses the relatively limited situations in which gene flow is likely to cause economic problems in the production of commercial biotech crops.
  47. Baldwin, Ford L. LibertyLink soybeans big step forward. Delta Farm Press, NE - Sep 26, 2008
    • The introduction of the LibertyLink/Ignite herbicide technology into the market is a big step forward. It will provide a broad-spectrum over-the-top alternative to Roundup Ready and glyphosate.
  48. Byford, Jim. 2002. GMO Systems Good for Wildlife. Southeast Farm Press.
    • Farm managers throughout cotton growing states (South Carolina, Georgia, Arizona, North Carolina, and Mississippi) have noticed increases in quail, rabbit, and turkey populations. They cite examples of quail nesting right in the cotton fields themselves, something unheard of until recently.
  49. Hegeman, Roxana. Biotech corn, soybeans encroaching on wheat acres. Associated Press. September 22, 2008.
    • Biotechnology that allows more profitable corn and soybean crops to thrive in arid fields is encroaching on traditional wheat acreage across the Great Plains, industry experts say.