• WHAT IS THE RDA FOR PROTEIN, AND IS IT ADEQUATE?

    Jul 12, 2022, 18:49 PM by Robert R. Wolfe, PhD and David Church
    The Recommended Dietary Allowance (RDA) is “the average daily dietary intake level sufficient to meet the nutrient requirements of nearly all (97–98%) healthy individuals in a group.” However, that definition does not match the term. The RDA is neither a “recommendation” nor an “allowance,” but rather a “adequate intake amount.” The RDA for protein (0.8g/kg/d) is based on analysis of nitrogen balance studies. Therefore, the RDA for protein is the amount of protein needed to avoid a negative nitrogen balance. This criterion creates 2 primary problems: (1) a misunderstanding of what the RDA actually means, and (2) the RDA for protein is not based on a health outcome.
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  • REQUIREMENTS FOR LABELING FOODS AS PROTEIN SOURCES

    Jul 12, 2022, 18:49 PM by James D. House, PhD
    Current dietary guidelines, including those in Canada and the United States, have advocated for the inclusion of more plant protein in the diet. For countries within the European Union as well as the United Kingdom, protein content claims are classified on the basis of protein content relative to energy content. Food products containing a minimum protein content of 12% of the energy value can carry a “source of protein claim.” Products with a protein content of 20% or higher can use the term “high protein.”
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  • CONSUMER MOTIVATION FOR ADDING PROTEIN TO THE DIET

    Jul 12, 2022, 18:49 PM by Joy Blakeslee, RDN
    Consumer desire for protein (plant and animal) continues to trend upwards. According to new research from the International Food Information Council (IFIC) protein is the #1 nutrient consumers say they “try to consume,” ranking higher than Vitamin D, Vitamin C, fiber, and calcium.
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  • NUTRIENT PROFILING: THE NEED FOR EVIDENCE-BASED FOOD CHOICES

    Mar 29, 2022, 14:22 PM by Naglaa El-Abbadi, PhD, MPH, and Ryan Simpson
    Chronic, non-communicable diseases are the leading cause of premature death and disability globally. These diseases are frequently linked to poor diet, defined commonly by excess caloric intake alongside high salt, refined sugar, and saturated fat intake, which are the hallmarks of some ultra-processed food products. Amidst the extreme volume and consistent marketing of these food products, consumers face the challenge of navigating food choices and comparing products as a part of a healthy diet in a prevailing unhealthy food environment. This situation warrants the application of new tools for comprehensive, standardized, and transparent guidance on food and dietary intake for consumers and health practitioners.
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  • THE ROLE OF PROCESSED FOODS IN THE DIET

    Mar 24, 2022, 18:46 PM by Mark Messina, PhD, MS
    Despite the many benefits of food processing (nutrient fortification, extended shelf-life, convenience, safety, etc.), many consumers have a negative perception of processed foods. Interest in the health impact of food processing has seen a dramatic resurgence of late. The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) defines processed foods as those which have undergone any changes to their natural state, and by this definition, most foods sold in grocery stores are processed. However, the issue at hand is not so much processing in general, but ultra-processing. In fact, in the past 2 years alone research on ultra-processed foods (UPFs) has increased 250%.
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  • CONSUMER RESEARCH EXPLORES PERSPECTIVES, PURCHASING BEHAVIORS FOR PLANT-BASED MEAT ALTERNATIVES

    Mar 24, 2022, 18:46 PM by Marisa Paipongna & Ali Webster, PhD, RD
    In just a few years’ time, plant-based meat alternatives (PBMAs) have immensely grown in popularity, even among those who don’t necessarily follow a plant-based diet (e.g., flexitarian, vegetarian, and vegan). These products, which are designed to mimic the flavor and texture of animal protein (many using soy as a primary ingredient), have expanded the variety of protein options available to people in the U.S. and across the globe. But just how prevalent are they in the diets of U.S. consumers, and what are the reasons for putting them on our plates?
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  • SOY AND BREAST CANCER: THEN AND NOW

    Jan 3, 2022, 03:00 AM by Mark Messina, PhD, MS
    The relationship between soy and breast cancer has been rigorously investigated for 30 years. This relationship, more than any other, is responsible for the research attention soyfoods have received. It is also responsible for much of the confusion among health professionals and consumers about the healthfulness of soyfoods. Take a look at how this research has advanced through the years.
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  • 30 YEARS OF RESEARCHING THE HEALTH BENEFITS OF SOY: THEN AND NOW

    Jan 2, 2022, 03:00 AM by Mark Messina, PhD, MS
    From 368 in 1992 to 3,000 in 2021, the number of soy-related articles indexed in PubMed has grown substantially. Looking back at how soy research on several health outcomes has evolved from then until now provides interesting perspective. Covering topics from cognitive function to osteoporosis, this article examines the last thirty years of soy research.
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  • SOY PRODUCTS ON THE MARKET: THEN AND NOW

    Jan 1, 2022, 03:00 AM by Kim Kirchherr, MS, RDN, LDN (IL), FAND
    For decades there have been numerous soyfood options available around the world –fermented, nonfermented, and ingredients. Today, many of these legacy soyfoods are landing on people’s plates for the first time, as “new-to-them” options. Over the past 30 years, soyfood choices have evolved and expanded through food innovation. Learn more about the options available in the supermarket today.
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  • RECIPE: Easy Skillet Tempeh with Caramelized Onions and Grapes

    Sep 9, 2021, 14:24 PM by Laura Yautz, RDN, LDN, NBC-HWC
    Now that summer is unofficially over, we're jumping into fall recipes head first! I love foods of the fall more than any other season and Easy Skillet Tempeh is just the thing to get us started!
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  • RESEARCH IN THE SPOTLIGHT: COMPREHENSIVE TECHNICAL REVIEW EVALUATES IMPACT OF SOY ON ENDOCRINE FUNCTION

    Aug 18, 2021, 16:09 PM by Mark Messina, PhD, MS,
    The term endocrine disruptor (ED) is relatively new, having originated in the early 1990s. In 1996, a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency workshop defined EDs as “exogenous agents that interfere with the production, release, transport, metabolism, binding action or elimination of natural hormones in the body responsible for the maintenance of homoeostasis and the regulation of developmental processes." Subsequently, an Endocrine Society statement re-defined EDs as “an exogenous chemical, or mixture of chemicals, that can interfere with any aspect of hormone action.”
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  • HOW LIFE CYCLE ASSESSMENTS MEASURE THE SUSTAINABILITY OF FOODS

    Jun 8, 2021, 17:00 PM by Andrew Berardy, PhD, MS, BS
    Our food choices have associated environmental impacts. Understanding how and why foods differ in their effects can help us make better, more informed decisions that advance the sustainability of the food system.
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  • SOY AND GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS

    Jun 8, 2021, 17:00 PM by Mark Messina, PhD, MS,
    The foods we eat impact our environment in multiple ways; one of the most important is via greenhouse gas emissions (GHGE). These include carbon dioxide, methane, and nitrous oxide. The importance of considering the environmental impact of food aligns with the position of the Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior, which is that environmental sustainability should factor into dietary guidance at both the individual and policy level.
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  • CONSUMER RESEARCH SHOWS SUPPORT FOR U.S. GROWN SOYBEANS

    Jun 8, 2021, 17:00 PM by Joy Blakeslee, RDN,
    As health professionals, you are accustomed to reading clinical nutrition research and translating those findings into food or nutrition-related recommendations, action steps, and goals for your clients, patients, and others you advise. However, the question that remains is whether your recommendations resonate in a meaningful way with your clients. Consumer research helps provide answers to this question.
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  • LATEST DIETARY APPROACHES TO DIABETES

    Apr 5, 2021, 16:52 PM by John L. Sievenpiper, MD, PhD, FRCPC,
    Diabetes represents one of the most important unmet prevention and treatment challenges. Despite an armamentarium of medications, diabetes and its complications have reached epidemic proportions and are rapidly increasing. The prevalence of diabetes is now more than 10% in the U.S. and Canada and diabetes remains the leading cause of blindness, end-stage kidney disease, non-traumatic lower limb amputation, and a leading cause of premature cardiovascular disease (CVD) and death. The economic impact has been described as an “economic tsunami” which threatens to bankrupt healthcare systems and damage economies; a problem compounded by the current COVID-19 pandemic where hospital and ICU admissions and mortality are among the highest in people with diabetes and its associated co-morbidities.
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  • SOY AND THE PREVENTION AND MANAGEMENT OF DIABETES

    Apr 5, 2021, 16:52 PM by Mark Messina, PhD, MS,
    There is a long history of researching the impact of soy on the prevention and treatment of type 2 diabetes (T2D). In 1910, Friedenwald and Ruhrah concluded that the “soybean in some way causes a reduction in the percentage and total quantity of sugar passed in diabetic subjects on the usual dietary restrictions.” This intriguing observation may have resulted from the low carbohydrate content of the soybean, which distinguishes it from other legumes (except peanuts), which are comprised predominantly of this macronutrient. Views vary on the utility of low-carbohydrate diets for treating T2D, but there is evidence supporting their efficacy. If soyfoods are helpful for those who have T2D (or those who are at risk of developing it), their low carbohydrate content may be one reason, but it is unlikely to be the primary one.
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  • New U.S. Dietary Guidelines Recommend Inclusion of Soyfoods

    Apr 5, 2021, 16:51 PM by Kaci Vohland, RDN, LD,
    The recently released 2020-2025 Dietary Guidelines for Americans set forth recommendations to “make every bite count.” Consumption of soyfoods is recommended throughout the new guidelines
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  • DIABETES ON A PLANT-BASED DIET

    Apr 5, 2021, 16:51 PM by Toby Smithson, MS, RDN, LD, CDCES, FAND,
    Evidence continues to show that people with diabetes who adopt a plant-based eating plan such as flexitarian, vegetarian, and vegan may see improvements in blood sugar, cholesterol, and blood pressure management and a reduction in overall mortality. Any healthy diabetes eating plan requires balancing carbohydrate, protein, and fat. For those with diabetes who choose to eat plant-based, soyfoods can be an important part of the diet because they provide high-quality protein and some are low in saturated fat. Some are also good sources of fiber.
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  • FATTY ACIDS, HEALTH, AND SOYBEAN OIL

    Jan 4, 2021, 19:45 PM by Kristina Petersen, PhD, APD, FAHA,
    Heart disease continues to be the leading cause of death in the United States, and resulted in more than 655,000 deaths in 2018. Data from observational and clinical trials have led to the identification of dietary approaches that reduce the risk of heart disease. Evidence indicates that soybean oil, when used as a replacement for saturated fat, improves blood cholesterol levels and may lower the risk of heart disease. In addition, clinical trials show soybean oil does not cause inflammation or oxidative stress.
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  • ANATOMY OF A QUALIFIED HEALTH CLAIM FOR HIGH OLEIC VEGETABLE OILS

    Jan 4, 2021, 19:45 PM by Guy Johnson, PhD,
    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved a total of 34 qualified health claims (QHCs). One of the most recent pertains to reduced risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) by edible oils high in oleic acid such as high oleic soybean oil: “Supportive but not conclusive scientific evidence suggests that daily consumption of about 1½ tablespoons (20g) of oils containing high levels of oleic acid, when replaced for fats and oils higher in saturated fat, may reduce the risk of coronary heart disease. To achieve this possible benefit, oleic acid-containing oils should not increase the total number of calories you eat in a day. One serving of [x] oil provides [x] grams of oleic acid (which is [x] grams of monounsaturated fatty acid).” However, the veracity of QHCs has been called into question by some organizations because the distinction between QHCs and their unqualified counterparts may not be clear. An understanding of the regulatory basis for such claims may be helpful for health professionals to guide consumers.
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